The different worlds of bike traffic

The city’s primary bike transportation guy, Sam Trebilcock, circulated this link regarding some discussion for the bike committee he facilitates.

I found it a comprehensive look at the different ways for people on bikes and people in cars to co-exist in an urban setting. If you every wanted to know more about all the different types of traffic flow, this is your chance.

Here’s an excerpt from the intro page….

The purpose of the NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide (part of the Cities for Cycling initiative) is to provide cities with state-of-the-practice solutions that can help create complete streets that are safe and enjoyable for bicyclists.

The NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide is based on the experience of the best cycling cities in the world. The designs in this document were developed by cities for cities, since unique urban streets require innovative solutions. Most of these treatments are not directly referenced in the current version of the AASHTO Guide to Bikeway Facilities, although they are virtually all (with two exceptions) permitted under the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). The Federal Highway Administration has posted information regarding MUTCD approval status of all of the bicycle related treatments in this guide and in August 2013 issued a memorandum officially supporting use of the document. All of the NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide treatments are in use internationally and in many cities around the US.

To create the Guide, the authors have conducted an extensive worldwide literature search from design guidelines and real-life experience. They have worked closely with a panel of urban bikeway planning professionals from NACTO member cities, as well as traffic engineers, planners, and academics with deep experience in urban bikeway applications.

thedependentclause

thedependentclause:

(Note: City Pages, FOX 9 Twin Cities, WCCO, and other local news outlets have asked me* to write the following addenda to their coverage of this incident.)

As usual, we invite all the bored, angry, and ignorant sociopaths who comprise a significant chunk of our readership to immediately…

Urban Planning and sustainability on #100Eyes

For reasons I’m not completely in touch with, I have an inordinate interest in how cities are planned and executed.

It’s not like I want to got to public planning school or anything. It’s not an obsession. I just think we can do a better, smarter job of controlling our growth.

My experience over the years is that the people who do this for a living, are pretty smart. They get it. However, they’re trying to get actual people to adapt their lifestyles a bit to make it work. That’s where it often goes wrong.

My guest on today’s show can shed some light on all these things.

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Jeff Schmitt is the city’s top planning official. He’s a whip smart dude who has been guiding Sioux Falls growth for quite awhile now.

Our discussion at 3 today will start with a package of stories we ran on Sunday.

You can read those stories here.

The chat is live right now and we’ll start with Jeff at 3.

I want to talk about how we overcome the suburban mentality that says keep building houses further and further from the core and just drive in. How do we build a city that is more sustainable in the long term?

The old model of suburbanization that drove development for the better part of the 20th century has problems. First, all those roads cost a lot of money. At the same time, people are actually driving less because of the cost of the gas and because young people don’t see it as a necessity.

Mass transit is huge. It has to get better in Sioux Falls.

Other alternative forms — yes, bicycling — must be included in the formula, encouraged, and funded.

I’ll put all those topics to Jeff and see what he has to say about it.

Jump in the chat and let us know what you think.

Unfortunately I couldn’t make it to the New Year’s Day ride in Sioux Falls. But, I did take an hour-long ride in the morning in Salem. This photo is the only know photo of the 2014 New Year’s Day Lap of Salem bike ride. The number of riders in the 2014 New Year’s Day Lap of Salem bike ride was the same as the number of degrees Fahrenheit in the temperature, 1.

Unfortunately I couldn’t make it to the New Year’s Day ride in Sioux Falls. But, I did take an hour-long ride in the morning in Salem. This photo is the only know photo of the 2014 New Year’s Day Lap of Salem bike ride. The number of riders in the 2014 New Year’s Day Lap of Salem bike ride was the same as the number of degrees Fahrenheit in the temperature, 1.

New Year’s Day ride. Impressive turnout for the 27th edition of the Spoke-n-Sport New Year’s Day Ride, particularly considering it was about 2 degrees this afternoon.

There was something in the range of 75 or so riders. But that’s just my estimate. Lots of folks also came out for free chili from Wendy’s to benefit the Center of Hope.

Photos courtesy Suzie Goebel.

It was cold and all but we had a good time. As usual when it’s that cold, my toes got a little numby but not terrible.

Thanks to the SFPD for the escort down to Falls Park.

Good to see everybody out on their bikes!

Back to the Ironman

Last year I took all of December off from training and then restarted on Jan. 1, 2013, with an eight-week block focused on swimming.

I came back focused on the goal of finishing my first full Ironman in Wisconsin in September. That worked, more or less, in that I did finish.

This year has been a little different. I didn’t really stop training after the Ironman but I quit adhering to a strict schedule. I did what I wanted. If it was nice out - I ran. I did a lot of cyclocross riding and racing. That was a lot of fun. Since the snow hit, I’ve been riding the trainer inside. 

I’ve been lifting weights to build muscle around some key joints, build stamina and try and prevent injury.

I quit tracking every piece of nutrition I put in my body.

And I haven’t been in the pool for weeks and weeks. (That’s due in part to the fact that the Y is getting rid of its pool in the remodel. It just makes it harder.)

The results are fairly predictable.

As of today, I’m a full 10 pounds heavier than my racing weight in September. I had to pull out an old pair of jeans with an extra inch on the waist on Christmas Day.

That means Jan. 1 is again a significant date in my training life.

It all starts again. The planning. The nutrition logging. The early mornings. Long runs. Bike trainer. Hello pool. Goodbye beer.

It’s a state of mind more than anything, a focus on the goal.

This year the goal is sub-12 hour Ironman. This year’s race is in Boulder on Aug. 3.

The goal is reachable. I finished in roughly 12:30 at Madison. There’s a little bit to make up in the swim, but not more than a few minutes. I was 1:22 and I think I can hit 1:15.

The bike should be better just based on terrain. You wouldn’t think that Boulder could be less hill than Wisconsin but that route around Madison is pretty brutal in terms of climbing. Boulder will have climbs but in Wisconsin there are many shorter, steeper pulls that make it harder, particularly on a TT bike. So I’m hoping to get back a little there, maybe 15 minutes or so. I was 6:06 at IMWI.

But the real opportunity for improvement is on the run. I’m sure everybody says that but I cracked hard on the second half of the run with some serious abdominal distress. I’m working on that area in several ways. One is core strength but perhaps more important is nutrition. I’ve switched a liquid base for the majority of the nutrient on the bike so that I’m not pounding clif blocks all day. I think that was a big problem.

I ran/walked a 4:45. That’s a really long time. I know I can get a lot closer to 4 hours. How close? Hard to tell but my goal is at least 4:15. That would put me under the 12 hours with some room to spare.

So, that’s going to be my year.

Sure hope to be better at this the second time around.

I’ll see you out there.

Back on the Street — I’m back to regular bike commuting again, which is really a better way to live.
It’s not that I wanted to stop but the demands of the cyclocross season were such that it required a lot of bike hauling to practice and such. That sounds a lot like the excuse of “I have to drive my kids around” I realize. Trust me, I’m not happy with it.
The truth is for much of the fall season I was able to do both. It’s just the last month or so that got dicey.
But this week I recommitted and broke out the Fat Rat for come urban pleasure. Since last winter I’ve added the Woodchipper bars rather than the straight bar. I hate straight bars. After some initial adjustments I think we’re getting it dialed in. It’s a comfortable — if not always fast — cruiser. And it can roll over and through about anything.
The return to the streets is always a re-education process and an interesting situation occurred that my urban bike instructor friends can give me some input upon.
I pulled up to the intersection of 12th and Grange the other day headed for Black Sheep Coffee. I was coming from 10th Street - one of my favorite thoroughfares as it’s smooth, cleared and a sharrow. The light was red so I pulled into the left turn lane. I was first in line. On my right was a police officer, going straight.
We waited for the light to the turn green. First the northbound traffic, including the lane turning west onto 12th was given the green. So we waited some more. Then the straight lane turned green going my direction, which meant the police officer could go. But my arrow stayed red. Clearly this meant that my bike did not trip the magnets that control the light mechanism. The stoplight didn’t think anybody was there so it remained red.
Having been through this many times, I just went.
The cop, however, rolled down his window and said to me “you’re running a red light.”
"It’s not going to turn," I said back, as he rolled out of range.
So, what’s the verdict?
I’m clearly in the right. I can’t get out of the lane if the light doesn’t turn and I have to follow traffic regs. Plus, the cop should know better.
So I’m back out there, in the cold and wind and snow. And loving it.
See you out there.

Back on the Street — I’m back to regular bike commuting again, which is really a better way to live.

It’s not that I wanted to stop but the demands of the cyclocross season were such that it required a lot of bike hauling to practice and such. That sounds a lot like the excuse of “I have to drive my kids around” I realize. Trust me, I’m not happy with it.

The truth is for much of the fall season I was able to do both. It’s just the last month or so that got dicey.

But this week I recommitted and broke out the Fat Rat for come urban pleasure. Since last winter I’ve added the Woodchipper bars rather than the straight bar. I hate straight bars. After some initial adjustments I think we’re getting it dialed in. It’s a comfortable — if not always fast — cruiser. And it can roll over and through about anything.

The return to the streets is always a re-education process and an interesting situation occurred that my urban bike instructor friends can give me some input upon.

I pulled up to the intersection of 12th and Grange the other day headed for Black Sheep Coffee. I was coming from 10th Street - one of my favorite thoroughfares as it’s smooth, cleared and a sharrow. The light was red so I pulled into the left turn lane. I was first in line. On my right was a police officer, going straight.

We waited for the light to the turn green. First the northbound traffic, including the lane turning west onto 12th was given the green. So we waited some more. Then the straight lane turned green going my direction, which meant the police officer could go. But my arrow stayed red. Clearly this meant that my bike did not trip the magnets that control the light mechanism. The stoplight didn’t think anybody was there so it remained red.

Having been through this many times, I just went.

The cop, however, rolled down his window and said to me “you’re running a red light.”

"It’s not going to turn," I said back, as he rolled out of range.

So, what’s the verdict?

I’m clearly in the right. I can’t get out of the lane if the light doesn’t turn and I have to follow traffic regs. Plus, the cop should know better.

So I’m back out there, in the cold and wind and snow. And loving it.

See you out there.

bikecentral

Some pics from Frosty Cross in Le Mars. I couldn’t make it this year but my Queen City Cycling teammates did pretty well.

The season is pretty much over. We’re still practicing because there’s a couple races in Kansas over the holiday week and then nationals in January in Boulder.

I’m planning on a season wrap here pretty soon, so watch for that.

And no, I can’t explain the horse head, but it turns up a lot.

bikecentral:

We had a cyclocross race a couple weeks ago. Here are some photos we took. Find more here  

thismachinekillscobbles
Powers has had quite the year for Rapha/Focus. This was in North Carolina last weekend I believe. He won both days and leads the USAC national rankings. I saw him a couple times this year, in Madison and Iowa City, and he pretty much just wore people down both places. He doesn’t ever start out front but he just keeps reeling people in until he’s at the front, and then crushes it the last lap. It’s an impressive thing to watch.
paulmunro:

#everybodyhighfive @brettcleaver @teamyachtclub #cx #crashbike

Powers has had quite the year for Rapha/Focus. This was in North Carolina last weekend I believe. He won both days and leads the USAC national rankings. I saw him a couple times this year, in Madison and Iowa City, and he pretty much just wore people down both places. He doesn’t ever start out front but he just keeps reeling people in until he’s at the front, and then crushes it the last lap. It’s an impressive thing to watch.

paulmunro:

#everybodyhighfive @brettcleaver @teamyachtclub #cx #crashbike